Cogitations

Don't know.
Can't tell you.

woodendreams:

Plitvice Lakes, Croatia (by Vesna Zivcic)

woodendreams:

Plitvice Lakes, Croatia (by Vesna Zivcic)

historicaltimes:

An Allied soldier bandages the paw of a Red Cross working dog in Belgium during WWI, May 1917

historicaltimes:

An Allied soldier bandages the paw of a Red Cross working dog in Belgium during WWI, May 1917

mindblowingscience:

When science meets aboriginal oral history


In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.
They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.
But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.
This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.
The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.
“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.
It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.
In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.
“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”
He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.
“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.
“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”



Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

When science meets aboriginal oral history

In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.

They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.

But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.

This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.

The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.

“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.

It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.

In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.

“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”

He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.

“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.

“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”

(via valdanderthal)

sixpenceee:

Pink Fairy Armadillo 
Known as the smallest species of armadillo, the pink fairy armadillo has a body that is approximately 90-115 millimeters in length, excluding the tail. It is called pink fairy armadillo because its body is pale rose or pink in color. What makes this animal special is that it can bury itself completely in just a few seconds when it is scared.

sixpenceee:

Pink Fairy Armadillo 

Known as the smallest species of armadillo, the pink fairy armadillo has a body that is approximately 90-115 millimeters in length, excluding the tail. It is called pink fairy armadillo because its body is pale rose or pink in color. What makes this animal special is that it can bury itself completely in just a few seconds when it is scared.

(via damagedbrainzs)

dorkstrider:

i’d like to think in a sort of apocalyptic situation i’d be a real hardass and take some motherfuckers out and be a ruthless leader but in reality i’d probably take some cheese crackers and hide in a tree and wait to die

(Source: queerrapidash, via iwillfindyouandiwillshipyou)

i-mnotbrokenjustbent:

madelinelime:

When I was a kid I thought your 20s were supposed to be fun, not filled with perpetual anxiety about financial stability and constantly feeling like an unaccomplished piece of shit. 

That’s because it was fun for baby boomers and they basically gave us this impression it would always be like that, but then they ruined the economy.

image

(Source: curseofthefanartlords, via iwillfindyouandiwillshipyou)

wolvensnothere:

sodomquake:

robowolves:

trimcoast:

orangemuses:

I love this post so much


my hand slipped

with their new hit song, “Randomly Searching 4 U”

I am re-reblogging just because that was so good

I think this one’s an Always Reblog, because the picture, the illustration, and the song title are just too damn perfect together.

wolvensnothere:

sodomquake:

robowolves:

trimcoast:

orangemuses:

I love this post so much

image

my hand slipped

with their new hit song, “Randomly Searching 4 U”

I am re-reblogging just because that was so good

I think this one’s an Always Reblog, because the picture, the illustration, and the song title are just too damn perfect together.

(Source: tardismetotomorrowworld, via damagedbrainzs)

ausonia:

What modern Mecca looks like

ausonia:

What modern Mecca looks like

vantasticmess:

eveil:

nightkinks:

scribblescruff:

brandonchesnutt:

Amazing Jurassic Park cosplay. I’m dying. Via Gamma Squad.


omg the video of them going around the con is HILARIOUS

Go faster. Must go faster.

This is the true spirit of cosplay
a full grown man riding in a Power Wheel modified to look like a Jurassic Park truck
with a lady in a raptor suit chasing him all over the convention
everyone else go home.

vantasticmess:

eveil:

nightkinks:

scribblescruff:

brandonchesnutt:

Amazing Jurassic Park cosplay. I’m dying. Via Gamma Squad.

omg the video of them going around the con is HILARIOUS

Go faster. Must go faster.

This is the true spirit of cosplay

a full grown man riding in a Power Wheel modified to look like a Jurassic Park truck

with a lady in a raptor suit chasing him all over the convention

everyone else go home.

(via damagedbrainzs)

diabeticsam:

Alternative Ghost Rider by bear65

(via damagedbrainzs)

gioji-kyoto:

祇王寺雪景色

gioji-kyoto:

祇王寺雪景色

(via fromthefloatingworld)

theladyintweed:

Beautiful Libraries:

Blickling Hall, England. 

theladyintweed:

Beautiful Libraries:

Blickling Hall, England. 

lilleeps:

iosremake:

cuddly-coati:

gently bap your passum

i dfont understand

bap youre pasum

lilleeps:

iosremake:

cuddly-coati:

gently bap your passum

i dfont understand

bap youre pasum

(via iwillfindyouandiwillshipyou)